RFSAN organizes workshop for land cover mapping of Jordan

Amman, Jordan: The Regional Food Security Analysis Network (RFSAN) in collaboration with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) organized a five-day workshop, held from 15-19 January 2017. The training comes as part of a broad initiative to strengthen an inclusive food security information network in support of humanitarian and resilience programming in the sub-region, affected by Syria crisis.

The workshop was officially opened by Eng. Abdullah Sheshani, Assistant Secretary General of the Ministry of Agriculture, together with Nasredin Hag Elamin, FAO Jordan Representative and Rene Verduijn, Chief Technical Advisor of RFSAN.

Verduijn highlighted the exceptional collaboration of FAO and iMMAP under RFSAN with the Jordanian Government in his opening statement. Verduijn welcomed the delegation of land cover mapping experts from FAO Headquarters in Rome under the leadership of the Senior Environmental Officer and Head of Geospatial Coordination Unit, John Latham, who delivered the training. “I am delighted that RFSAN could bring global experts to provide specialized training on land cover mapping and image interpretation,” said Hag Elamin. In his remarks, Hag Elamin emphasized that participants will be trained using the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) guidelines in land cover mapping.

The training hosted representatives from government entities, such as the Ministry of Agriculture, Ministry of Water and Irrigation, Jordan Metrology Department, Department of Statistics and international organizations, including FAO, iMMAP, and RFSAN.

In addition to the fundamentals and benefits of land cover mapping, the workshop incorporated topics such as the progress of land cover mapping in Jordan, including the guidelines and applications relevant to the country. Also included in the training were FAO’s approach to land cover mapping classification system, production chain and tools.

Land cover is the most important element for description and study of the environment, according to Latham. The Senior Environmental Officer adds that data on land cover are critical for natural resources monitoring and sustainable management. The current status of land cover is an essential parameter for monitoring water, weather, climate, energy, ecosystem, health, agriculture, disasters and biodiversity and assessing the impact of the humanitarian crisis. Monitoring change in land cover can provide direct evidence to the impact of the Syrian Crisis on Jordan’s natural resources. RFSAN’s main strength lies in providing technical support in identifi¬ed priority areas of food security information and early warning systems.

The Regional Food Security Analysis Network (RFSAN) is a partnership between iMMAP and FAO, working in close collaboration with various humanitarian and development actors in the sector of food security in Jordan, Lebanon, Iraq and Syria. One of the many tasks of the program is to understand the implications of agricultural and natural environment change of the Syria crisis on food security in the region.

Amman, Jordan: The Regional Food Security Analysis Network (RFSAN) in collaboration with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) organized a five-day workshop, held from 15-19 January 2017. The training comes as part of a broad initiative to strengthen an inclusive food security information network in support of humanitarian and resilience programming in the sub-region, affected by Syria crisis.

The workshop was officially opened by Eng. Abdullah Sheshani, Assistant Secretary General of the Ministry of Agriculture, together with Nasredin Hag Elamin, FAO Jordan Representative and Rene Verduijn, Chief Technical Advisor of RFSAN.

Verduijn highlighted the exceptional collaboration of FAO and iMMAP under RFSAN with the Jordanian Government in his opening statement. Verduijn welcomed the delegation of land cover mapping experts from FAO Headquarters in Rome under the leadership of the Senior Environmental Officer and Head of Geospatial Coordination Unit, John Latham, who delivered the training. “I am delighted that RFSAN could bring global experts to provide specialized training on land cover mapping and image interpretation,” said Hag Elamin. In his remarks, Hag Elamin emphasized that participants will be trained using the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) guidelines in land cover mapping.

The training hosted representatives from government entities, such as the Ministry of Agriculture, Ministry of Water and Irrigation, Jordan Metrology Department, Department of Statistics and international organizations, including FAO, iMMAP, and RFSAN.

In addition to the fundamentals and benefits of land cover mapping, the workshop incorporated topics such as the progress of land cover mapping in Jordan, including the guidelines and applications relevant to the country. Also included in the training were FAO’s approach to land cover mapping classification system, production chain and tools.

Land cover is the most important element for description and study of the environment, according to Latham. The Senior Environmental Officer adds that data on land cover are critical for natural resources monitoring and sustainable management. The current status of land cover is an essential parameter for monitoring water, weather, climate, energy, ecosystem, health, agriculture, disasters and biodiversity and assessing the impact of the humanitarian crisis. Monitoring change in land cover can provide direct evidence to the impact of the Syrian Crisis on Jordan’s natural resources. RFSAN’s main strength lies in providing technical support in identifi¬ed priority areas of food security information and early warning systems.

The Regional Food Security Analysis Network (RFSAN) is a partnership between iMMAP and FAO, working in close collaboration with various humanitarian and development actors in the sector of food security in Jordan, Lebanon, Iraq and Syria. One of the many tasks of the program is to understand the implications of agricultural and natural environment change of the Syria crisis on food security in the region.

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